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Daedalus Courses

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Please note that as of 2016, most of the information below no longer applies, but may give some understanding of our programs.

Please stay tuned as we make changes to our 2015-2016 programs. Course enrollment will be capped based on the type of course and age of participants, and we will announce capacities where appropriate as we begin to schedule classes. Course descriptions are ever evolving, and sometimes take shape according to the needs of the students, so take each description and syllabus as a general guide. Each student must interview with Daedalus and complete a registration form. To enroll in a course now, click here.

At Daedalus, we believe that education is a philosophy, not simply the sum total of facts learned. Our programs aim to motivate and inspire and are designed to flexibly fit young learners who are given room to explore under the guidance of a professional mentor. Just as life involves constant change, so too will Daedalus programs change. We expect many of our programs to develop according to the interests and innovations of the members of the Daedalus community. Each Daedalus course includes a written evaluation by the instructor highlighting both academic and personal growth.

Click here for for the current class schedule. We may still add classes as demand warrants.



Costs of our programs vary. The following provides basic descriptions of our programs.



Business, Finance, and Economics Courses

Daedalus is currently planning a number of unique programs and courses aimed and middle and high school students in the areas of business, finance, and economics. Do you have a student interested in game theory, or one interested in the "Do It Yourself" process of building a business? If so, please let us know! We plan to offer these courses as soon as instructor time and student demand is ready.

Communications

  • Writing for Middle School: This eight-week course will focus on the descriptive and expository modes of writing typically used in middle schools. Topics covered will include pre-writing, organizational patterns, crafting topic sentences and thesis statements, incorporating textual support or evidence, providing specific analysis, use of imagery and an introduction to literary devices. Students may bring their own assignments and texts to use for projects. A composition notebook will be provided. Laptops are optional.
  • Public Speaking for Middle School : This eight-week course will include the communication process, constructing a speech, informative and persuasive speaking, impromptu speaking, discussion techniques and delivery techniques. All students will prepare, practice and present speeches each week. Writing materials required. Laptops or tablets are useful but optional.
  • Introduction to Debate for Middle School : The Team Manager for the USA Debate Team will introduce students to debate through creation of arguments, research techniques, persuasive speech preparation, cross-examination techniques, refutation, note-taking and delivery techniques. Students will experience a variety of debate formats. Writing materials required. Laptops or tablets for researching are helpful.


Mathematics

Daedalus offers a wide array of courses for young mathematical explores and problem solvers investigating the beauty and immense power of mathematics. Daedalus courses are designed to be enjoyable and inspiration, and at the higher levels, quite intense! Our thousands of pages of unique curriculum allow students both organized and nonlinear exploration (choose your own adventure!) that in many cases provides additional hours of learning guidance. Please note that age and grade suggestions are just that---suggestions. We understand that different students are ready for different courses at different times. Student interviews are designed to help us recommend the best course for each student. Click here to see a visual progression through our courses, which you can read more about below.


  • Contest Problem Solving Classes: Math competitions are not for everyone, but for some they are an exciting challenge. We are in the process of working out details for how to run these course, but they will be designed by a winner of numerous national competitions. Goal one: have fun. Goal two: see how high you can climb! The following is a proposed set of contest preparation classes. We may offer national Olympiad training classes sometime in the future. These classes tend to have less organized curriculum, focusing more on the development of problem solving skills, including recognizing which curricular tools may be useful. More details to come soon.
    • Introduction to the AMC 8 and MATHCOUNTS: Using problems and past tests from these and other competitions, students learn to apply an array of problem solving tactics and strategies to find solutions. This course is fine for students with little or no formal training in middle school level math, but who show the ability and desire to turn information into answers.
    • AMC 8 and MATHCOUNTS Veterans: Students already scoring well on the AMC 8 and at chapter level MATHCOUNTS continue to develop their skills by working the harder AMC 8 problems and chapter/state MATHCOUNTS problems, some AMC 10 and National MATHCOUNTS problems. It is recommended that students taking this class have a strong grasp of PreAlgebra curriculum, meaning experience with principles of basic algebra and geometry. We will do the rest with good planning and flexible minds.
    • MATHCOUNTS Masters: A highly challenging course suited for the most advanced and competitive middle school mathletes.
    • AMC 10 Preparation: Concepts and problems covered are generally from the last 2/3 of AMC 10 exams, meaning students are assumed to be able to solve most of the early problems (100% is certainly not necessary). Class discussions conform to the needs of participating students.
    • AMC 12 Preparation: Concepts and problems covered are generally from the last 2/3 of AMC 12 exams, meaning students are assumed to be able to solve most of the early problems (100% is certainly not necessary). Class discussions conform to the needs of participating students.
    • AIME Preparation: We recommend this course for students scoring 2 to 10 on the AIME, or those who simply want the most practice. Problem solving approaches, concepts, techniques, strategies, and mindset are the focus, though discussions may help students fill in some curricular gaps.

  • Explorers A: Talented and gifted third grade students expand on their understanding of arithmetic through games, puzzles, and problem solving challenges.
    • Ten week courses are offered in the Fall, Winter, and Spring.
    • These classes last one hour once per week (10 hours).
    • The Summer course is a one week mini-camp that meets three hours per day Monday through Friday (15 hours).

  • Explorers B: Talented and gifted fourth grade students explore the basics of topics such as algebra, geometry, counting methods, probability, and more with an eye toward developing mathematical tools of investigation.
    • Ten week courses are offered in the Fall, Winter, and Spring.
    • These classes last one and one half hour (90 minutes) once per week (15 hours).
    • The Summer course is a two week mini-camp that meets three hours per day Monday through Friday (30 hours).

  • Explorers C: Talented and gifted fifth grade students sharpen problem solving skills solving problems and puzzles involving a wide array of problem solving tools, tactics, and strategies.
    • Ten week courses are offered in the Fall, Winter, and Spring.
    • These classes last one and one half hour (90 minutes) once per week (15 hours).
    • The Summer course is a two week mini-camp that meets three hours per day Monday through Friday (30 hours).

  • Introductory A: Talented and motivated sixth grade students build a solid foundation in a variety of mathematical topics.
    • Introductory A Summer Course (Games, Puzzles, and Problem Solving): An enjoyable exploration of the principles of mathematics as applied to games, puzzles, and problem solving. While the topics develop to quite serious levels, it's all still a matter of fun and games. This mathematical mini-camp meets Monday through Friday for three hours classes for two weeks (30 hours).
    • Introductory A Fall Course (Counting and Probability): Topics covered include casework, pair counting, Venn diagrams, Pascal's Triangle, permutations, combinations, basics of probability and much more. This ten week course meets once a week for two hours (20 hours).
    • Introductory A Winter Course (Geometry): Topics covered include areas, perimeters, and volumes of common shapes, breaking shapes into pieces in order to work with them, the Pythagorean Theorem with distance applications, and much more. This ten week course meets once a week for two hours (20 hours).
    • Introductory A Spring Course (The Integers): This course covers basics of number theory and problem solving applications from a pre-algebra perspective. This ten week course meets once a week for two hours (20 hours).

  • Introductory B: Talented and motivated seventh grade students learn the basics of algebra, often using a more sophisticated set of tools to tackle many areas of mathematics.
    • Introductory B Summer Course (Honors Pre-Algebra): Calling this course "Pre-Algebra" is only partially accurate. Students learn to handle a wide variety of irrational numbers, solve equations and systems of equations, set up and solve a wide variety of problems using algebra, and graph lines and inequalities. Games and competitions motivate students to dig a little deeper into the details, and develop a big picture understanding of the principles covered. This mathematical mini-camp meets Monday through Friday for three hours classes for two weeks (30 hours). In addition to class time, students should expect to spend one to two hours on homework per class in order to get the most out of class.
    • Introductory B Fall Course (Patterns, Sequences, Series, and Algorithms): Armed with basic tools of algebra, students investigate these topics more deeply, developing their own formulas at times. Techniques are highlighted more than recipes. This ten week course meets once a week for two hours (20 hours).
    • Introductory B Winter Course (Geometry With Variables): Topics include polygons, applications of the Pythagorean Theorem, circles, 3D geometry, and much more. This ten week course meets once a week for two hours (20 hours).
    • Introductory B Spring Course (Number Theory Basics): This course covers basics of number theory, including enjoyable mental math tactics that make math fun and easier. This ten week course meets once a week for two hours (20 hours).

  • Introductory C: Talented and motivated eighth grade students deepen their understanding of algebra, and explore the ways in which the areas of mathematics often come together in amazing ways.
    • Introductory C Summer Course (Honors Algebra): Students learn not just to solve quadratic equations and make use of quadratic expressions, but to understand the process completely and able to derive the quadratic formula. Topics also include the basics of complex numbers, graphing parabolas, and more. Games and competitions motivate students to dig a little deeper into the details, and develop a big picture understanding of the principles covered. This mathematical mini-camp meets Monday through Friday for three hours classes for two weeks (30 hours). In addition to class time, students should expect to spend one to three hours on homework per class in order to get the most out of class.
    • Introductory C Fall Course (Counting and Probability): Topics covered include permutations, combinations, Pascal's Triangle, the Binomial Expansion Theorem, the Principle of Inclusion-Exclusion, independent probability, dependent probability, conditional probability and much more. Many lessons are punctuated with team games based on problems that reinforce class lessons. This ten week course meets once a week for two hours (20 hours).
    • Introductory C Winter Course (Problem Solving): Topics include functions, algebraic symmetry, recursive algebra, infinite series, parity, the pigeonhole principle, and much more. This ten week course meets once a week for two hours (20 hours).
    • Introductory C Spring Course (Number Theory With Algebra): Students extend a pre-algebra understanding of number theory, applying algebra and developing the tools of modular arithmetic and other subjects. This ten week course meets once a week for two hours (20 hours).

  • Intermediate A: Ninth grade students seeking challenge learn a more rigorous geometry curriculum, then move on amazing explorations in combinatorics and probability.
    • Intermediate A Summer Course (Honors Geometry I): This curriculum begins with the rebuilding of the mathematics of geometry from the ground floor, allowing students a fresh perspective from which to learn rigorous proofs and constructions. Highlights include congruence theorems and a deepening of mastery of right triangles, but the greatest emphasis is placed on similarity. Intraclass competitions motivate students to dig a little deeper into the details, and develop a big picture understanding of the principles covered. This mathematical mini-camp meets Monday through Friday for three hours classes for two weeks (30 hours). In addition to class time, students should expect to spend two to three hours on homework per class in order to get the most out of class.
    • Intermediate A Fall Course (Geometry II): Topics include polygons, geometric inequalities, circles, and power of a point. Students unfamiliar with the Geometry I summer course may find the approach and challenge greater than expected. Many lessons are punctuated with team games based on problems that reinforce class lessons. This ten week course meets once a week for two hours (20 hours).
    • Intermediate A Winter Course (Combinatorics and Probability): A fascinating exploration of topics that includes introductions to recursion, conditional probability, combinatorial modeling, and combinatorial identities. These topics may seem foreign to many students, but many discover they are able to handle more than they recognized due to the time spent weaving an understanding of new topics. This ten week course meets once a week for two hours (20 hours).
    • Intermediate A Spring Course (Problem Solving): A fascinating exploration of topics that includes combinatorial geometry, parity, frames of reference, the pigeonhole principle, mathematical induction, and much more. These topics may seem foreign to many students, but many discover they are able to handle more than they recognized due to the time spent weaving an understanding of new topics. This ten week course meets once a week for two hours (20 hours).

  • Intermediate B: Tenth grade students seeking a more rigorous and expansive curriculum covering Algebra II, conics, trigonometry the basics of classical inequalities, discrete calculus, algebra symmetry, number theory, and much more.
    • Intermediate B Summer Course (Honors Algebra II with Analytic Geometry): This course begins with an expansion of the big picture view of algebra, and students learn a greater fortitude for handling more challenging equations and other algebraic challenges. Students then discover the basic definitions of conic sections, and from those definitions build equations for each, learning how to understand and handle changing shapes both qualitatively and quantitatively. From there, we apply well practiced problem solving strategies to all the new algebra learned. Intraclass competitions motivate students to dig a little deeper into the details, and develop a big picture understanding of the principles covered. This mathematical mini-camp meets Monday through Friday for three hours classes for two weeks (30 hours). In addition to class time, students should expect to spend two to three hours on homework per class in order to get the most out of class.
    • Intermediate B Fall Course (Trigonometry): Topics covered will include triangle trigonometry, circle trigonometry, trigonometric identities, applications with complex numbers, cyclotomic polynomials, roots of unity, and much more. This ten week course meets once a week for two hours (20 hours).
    • Intermediate B Winter Course (Number Theory): Topics include divisibility, modular arithmetic (including Fermat's Little Theorem and Euler's Theorem), combinatorial number theory, Diophantine equations, and additional topics. This ten week course meets once a week for two hours (20 hours).
    • Intermediate B Spring Course (Algebraic Techniques): Topics include discrete calculus and other topics in sequences and series, logarithms and other interesting functions, inequalities, functional equations, algebraic symmetry, and much more. This ten week course meets once a week for two hours (20 hours).

  • Advanced Courses: Daedalus Advanced Mathematics Courses are designed for pre-university philomaths ready for explorations of non-calculus based mathematics at a higher level. We plan to begin offering these Advanced classes in 2014. We are currently considering the possibility of adding a series of calculus courses, and potentially additional topics.
    • Advanced PreCalculus
    • Advanced Summer Course (Number Theory): This course covers Diophantine equations, a rigorous development of modular arithmetic, linear congruence and systems, the Chinese Remainder Theorem, Fermat's/Euler's Theorems, and much more. This mathematical mini-camp meets Monday through Friday for three hours classes for two weeks (30 hours). In addition to class time, students should expect to spend two to three hours on homework per class in order to get the most out of class.
    • Advanced Fall Course (Combinatorics): Topics including combinatorial modeling, sets (as a toolset, but also topics such as derangements), algebraic combinatorics (including recursion and generating functions), an introduction to graph theory, and more. This ten week course meets once a week for two hours (20 hours).
    • Advanced Winter Course (Geometry): Deeper exploration of difficult topics such as locus problems, centers of triangles, and trigonometric applications in geometry; new topics such as Ptolemy's Inequality and complex geometry, and topics of perspective including symmetries and the "bigger picture". This ten week course meets once a week for two hours (20 hours).
    • Advanced Spring Course (Inequalities and Optimization): Topics include techniques, tactics, geometric inequalities, trigonometric inequalities, the Mean Inequality Chain, the Cauchy-Schwarz Inequality, isoperimetry, and much more. This ten week course meets once a week for two hours (20 hours).

  • Olympiad Mathematics: Daedalus now offers incomparable training for Olympiad math students, meaning students able to prepare for exploratory examinations such as the USAJMO, USAMO, and similar events. There is no topic list as class may conform to the needs and directions of the students.


Programming and Technology

For many years, technology and programming have been valuable areas of study. In today's world, understanding technology and how to code are essential for a broader and broader array of professions, yet a small fraction of middle and high schools teach any kind of programming or technology classes. Daedalus intends to create a wide array of options for curious and creative young learners in the areas of programming and technology. Check back here from time to time or stay informed through our newsletter.
  • Introduction to Computer Networks: This 10 week course guides students through the basics of computer network architecture and how to make machines talk to one another. This course is aimed at students of ages 9-16 with knowledge of computers who want to begin exploring the communication systems of machines. Students will learn about Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) model,various protocols for transmitting data, and work together on projects that make use of this knowledge.


Tutoring and Mentoring

Daedalus finds and employs highly select tutors and mentors in a broad array of subjects, not limited to our areas of class offerings. If you have a student or small group in need of personal attention, you can contact us to see if we have staff who can help. Rates vary by subject, experience level of the mentor or tutor, and in some cases group size. To note: one of our tutors achieved perfects scores of 2400 and 36 on the SAT and the ACT, respectively.

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